Mariah.

TV Guide's 25 Best Shows of the Decade (2010-2019)

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TV changed more this decade than it had any time since it switched from black and white to color. From who we watched (people from communities that had never gotten the chance to tell their stories on TV before), to how we watched it (on our phones via streaming platforms), every part of the TV experience changed. And there was just more TV this decade, as the most recent Golden Age of Television evolved into Peak TV, and networks and streaming services competed in a content arms race to see who could make the most shows the fastest. This led to both an abundance of amazing choices for TV viewers, as well as an overwhelming sense of option paralysis that sent viewers back into the warm, familiar embrace of Friends and The Office, the most popular shows of the decade that didn't even come out this decade.

Best TV of the Decade: The Shows, Moments, and Trends That Defined the 2010s

The sheer number of great shows released this decade made compiling a "best of" list nearly impossible. Conversations got heated and feelings got hurt. ("You haven't watched Terriers? How do you even work here?") But every show on this list is unimpeachable, and we're proud to share it with you. It's a diverse list that hopefully touches on everything that made this decade of TV great.

(Editor's Note: In order to be eligible for consideration, a show had to debut on or after Jan. 1, 2010.)

25. The Jinx (HBO, 2015)
24. Crazy Ex-Girlfriend (The CW, 2015-19)
23. Happy Valley (BBC, 2014-16)
22. You're the Worst (FX/FXX, 2014-19)
21. Parenthood (NBC, 2010-15)
20. Twin Peaks: The Return (Showtime, 2017)
19. Better Things (FX, 2016-Present)
18. GLOW (Netflix, 2017-Present)
 

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GLOW is a Trojan horse wrapped in spandex. The '80s-set Netflix comedy hooks you with the promise of a glittery story about women's wrestling, but what makes the show such a knockout is its refusal to water down the complexity of its characters. GLOW is smart about the reasons women inflict pain. The core of the series is a friendship — between aspiring actress Ruth (Alison Brie) and former soap star Debbie (Betty Gilpin) — fractured by betrayal and diverging ambitions, and Gilpin's performance has only gotten more thrilling by the season as the show, through her, explores the price of power in show business. But even as the series goes deep, it still manages to deliver all the neon-soaked joy that spandex Trojan horse promised. It's a sharp, divinely funny triumph. — Kelly Connolly

17. Hannibal (NBC, 2013-15)
 

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Hannibal airing for three seasons on broadcast television feels like a fever dream we collectively experienced from 2013 to 2015. But it's real. It definitely happened. And Bryan Fuller's version of Hannibal Lecter, memorably brought to life by Mads Mikkelsen, was a gift that was as hauntingly beautiful as it was macabre. A striking piece of art that tore open its viewers' hearts, the series dissected the complicated relationship between the cannibalistic psychiatrist of Thomas Harris' novels and empathic FBI profiler Will Graham (Hugh Dancy), two men who understood each other in ways no one else could. The show would eventually come to embrace its queerness in a way that we maybe should have expected — and would have had we allowed ourselves to hope — with the two men consummating their relationship in the series finale by killing a man together. So while Hannibal may have gutted people physically, Hannibal gutted us emotionally (and relentlessly). Which is to say that we're still not over the cliffhanger that saw both men plunge over a cliff into a watery abyss, but we'll never stop praising the show for its ability to push the boundaries of network television and remind us what is possible when art is given a chance. — Kaitlin Thomas

16. Jane the Virgin (The CW, 2014-19)
 

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There were a lot of TV critics who rolled their eyes when they first heard the title Jane the Virgin, and each and every one had to eat their words when Jennie Snyder Urman's telenovela quickly became a TV favorite. It was so good that it earned The CW its first Golden Globe nomination and brought Gina Rodriguez to the world stage. A lot of shows balance drama and comedy in a single narrative with impressive results; Jane the Virgin went even further, balancing drama, comedy, soapy romance, and suspense in a way that kept us on our toes every week as Jane's journey unfolded. Over the course of five seasons and 100 episodes, the series broke our hearts and made us weep with joy. It made us laugh out loud and swoon. It was about family, love, and pursuing your dreams of becoming your best self. There has never been anything quite like it on American television before, and there may never be again. Jane the Virgin was a surprising gift that will keep a very special place in our hearts for a very long time. — Megan Vick

15. Bob's Burgers (Fox, 2011-Present)
14. Stranger Things (Netflix, 2016-Present)
 

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Filmmakers have been trying to recapture the feelings audiences experienced while watching Amblin movies in the 1980s since the 1980s, but all it took was a television show. Now, it would have been so easy for Stranger Things, created by Matt and Ross Duffer, to collapse into treacly nostalgia, but over the course of its three seasons (thus far), the Netflix series has deftly avoided such pitfalls by simply providing relentless entertainment. Blessed with a cast of young actors who are better than most adults (all hail casting director Carmen Cuba for putting Millie Bobby Brown, Joe Keery, and Gaten Matarazzo in our lives), Stranger Things is both a greatest hits mash-up of Stephen King, John Carpenter, Steven Spielberg, and Richard Donner and an original creation that future generations will try to emulate when they want to harken back to the shows of their youth. It's the Goonies remake we never got but totally deserve. — Christopher Rosen

13. Power (Starz, 2014-Present)
12. American Crime Story (FX, 2016-Present)
 

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American Crime Story debuted more than halfway through the decade and quickly became one of the best shows of the 2010s for the way it looked at the past. In 2016's The People v. O.J. Simpson, a cast of all-stars, including Emmy winners Sarah Paulson and Sterling K. Brown, transported viewers back to 1994 so we could see the celebrity worship, male privilege, and toxic sexism that let someone get away with murder. The Assassination of Gianni Versace, starring an exceptional Darren Criss and megastars Ricky Martin and Penelope Cruz, dropped us in glamorous Miami circa 1997 to witness the societal homophobia that ultimately claimed the life of a creative visionary. No other show dazzles the eye and pries open a time capsule like this one, and none other can seduce audiences while getting them to pay attention to important lessons we didn't understand the first time. — Malcolm Venable

11. The Good Place (NBC, 2016-Present)
10. Game of Thrones (HBO, 2011-19)
 

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Game of Thrones fans may have been dismayed by the series' calamitous final stretch, but that's only because of how incredible the first few seasons truly were. When co-creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss had the strength of George R.R. Martin's books to guide their scripts, their adaptation was superb. Game of Thrones became one of those rare things that's both inescapably popular and extremely good, with nuanced dialogue, ornate costuming, meticulous production design, and shocking, watch-through-your-fingers violence underscoring its spectacle appeal. Put simply, it was a show that captured and excited audiences like no other could in such a crowded era of television. Even if we had our hang-ups about certain plot points and character choices that came along after the show lapped the book events, Game of Thrones was still an outstanding watch and absolutely defined the decade. There will never be a show this big again. — Amanda Bell

9. Rectify (SundanceTV, 2013-16)
8. Schitt's Creek (Pop, 2015-Present)
7. Fleabag (Amazon, 2016-19)
6. Better Call Saul (AMC, 2015-Present)
 

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The immediate reaction to AMC announcing a spin-off of Breaking Bad built around the character of Saul Goodman was mostly dismissive murmurs. Why would anyone mess with one of the greatest shows of all time? (Friendly reminder: Breaking Bad is not on this list because even though most of its run was in the '10s, it premiered in 2008.) Those complaints turned out to be knee-jerk whining from people who never realized what made Breaking Bad so good in the first place: the creator behind the show. Vince Gilligan and Saul co-creator Peter Gould didn't just hand over the keys to Albuquerque's scummiest, they built a new ride from the ground up using everything they learned from Breaking Bad. The result is a show that may not have the murder and meth-making mayhem of Breaking Bad, but the downslide of Jimmy McGill into Saul Goodman is just as impressive of a character study as the transformation of Walter White. Additionally, with extraordinary performances from a stellar cast led by Bob Odenkirk and Rhea Seehorn, stunning cinematography, and elaborate cons as methodical as anything Heisenberg pulled off, Better Call Saul is a lot more like Breaking Bad than most think. And dare we say, arguably better? — Tim Surette

5. Atlanta (FX, 2016-Present)
 

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Where were you the first time you watched "Teddy Perkins?" I remember getting an email from FX the day it premiered giving a heads-up that that night's episode would be presented commercial-free. "Oh, damn," I thought. "This is gonna be a big deal." And then of course I had some other, much less important thing going on that night, so I didn't watch it live. I robbed myself of feeling the joyous collective "WTF am I watching?" that overtook everyone who watched Darius survive his own personal Get Out at the hands of Michael Jackson-ish recluse Teddy Perkins, played by series creator-writer-star Donald Glover in horrifying whiteface.

"Teddy Perkins" is kind of like Atlanta's hit single, but even the deep cuts are incredible. Every single episode has been great, and the second season, aka Atlanta Robbin' Season, is absolute bangers all the way through. There's "Teddy Perkins," but there's also Katt Williams' alligator, the Schnappviecher, and Alfred's quixotic quest to get a haircut. The show has made stars out of Brian Tyree Henry, Lakeith Stanfield, and Zazie Beetz while giving Glover the artistic credibility to do whatever he wants for at least the next decade (which he'll start with two more seasons of Atlanta). But most importantly, it's presented a complex, tragicomic vision of black American life that has never been depicted in this particular way before. It stays under your skin. — Liam Mathews

4. Justified (FX, 2010-15)
3. The Leftovers (HBO, 2014-17)
 

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The Leftovers was not a show about grief. It was about confronting the unknowable. The HBO drama, co-created by Lost's Damon Lindelof and author Tom Perrotta, could be read as a direct response to the controversy around the Lost finale: On The Leftovers, the lack of answers was the point. Set in the dazed aftermath of the sudden vanishing of 2 percent of the world's population, the series evolved past its bleak first season to tell a story more expansive, and more quietly magical, than anything else on TV. But while the unrelenting anguish of the first few episodes turned some viewers off, it wasn't a flaw in the big picture. The distance between where The Leftovers began and where it ended was part of what made the second and third seasons so effective: It was thrilling to watch the show break its own rules. When the characters found their own ways to heal, it felt like rebellion.

In a stacked cast, it was Carrie Coon's bruised, dryly funny performance as Nora Durst that emerged as the heart of the show. More than two years later, fans are still debating whether the story she told in the series finale was true — Coon vowed in her old Twitter bio, "I'll never tell" — but like everything on The Leftovers, it hits harder without a definitive answer. The Leftovers didn't capture life exactly as it is but as it feels. It will be looked back on as a snapshot of a chaotic decade striving for grace. — Kelly Connolly

2. Veep (HBO, 2012-19)
1. The Americans (FX, 2013-18)
 

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Here's the truth: From top to bottom, no other show on TV from 2010 to 2019 was as complete as FX's The Americans. The Cold War drama asked a simple question from its first episode and definitively answered it in its all-too-real finale: Can a family survive a lifetime of secrets?

Few shows leapt off the page from the get-go like The Americans. A story about a man and woman forced to come together and start a family under the pressure of espionage behind enemy lines obviously became a pressure cooker for a spy drama — brought to life in meticulous detail thanks to creator Joe Weisberg's past as a CIA officer — but it was the family drama that served as the beating heart. Though few of us can claim to be Russian agents, Philip (Matthew Rhys) and Elizabeth's (Keri Russell) marriage and the occupational complications that threatened to undermine it became metaphors for every relationship and couple raising a family, and the way Philip and Elizabeth handled them grounded the show in stark reality.

In the series finale, one of the finest series-closers in television history, our fears were realized as the family we all knew was doomed from the start fell apart. It was an inevitable and perfect conclusion. While their kids stayed in America, the country that raised them, Philip and Elizabeth were forced back to Russia, never to see them again. Authenticity was The Americans' greatest asset and the series never once lost sight of that, even if it meant crushing us in the finale that couldn't have gone any other way. — Tim Surette

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Oh Hannibal. They butchered some parts of that franchise, but some parts were incredible. I always hoped Netflix would pick it up and finish the series. I heard rumors that the following seasons were supposed to follow the books/movies and I was curious to see their take on it. And I wanted more Mads.

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ok at this excellent list, but the americans at number 1????

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Oh wow, oh wow! This list is incredible, the taste really jumped out! :clap:

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29 minutes ago, shumiley said:

ok at this excellent list, but the americans at number 1????

never seen ha, but what do you prefer? I've never heard a bad thing about Americans tbh

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Just now, Mariah. said:

never seen ha, but what do you prefer? I've never heard a bad thing about Americans tbh

it's definitely not a bad show but game of thrones was absolutely the show of the decade. it went out poorly but it ruled the 2010s more than anything else. it's probably the last scripted show the masses will ever watch together as most other shows are on streaming services initially or people just dvr them/use hulu. if i made one based purely on my personal taste it would've been something like b99/glow/smash but got definitely deserved at least a much higher place than number 10

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Just now, shumiley said:

it's definitely not a bad show but game of thrones was absolutely the show of the decade. it went out poorly but it ruled the 2010s more than anything else. it's probably the last scripted show the masses will ever watch together as most other shows are on streaming services initially or people just dvr them/use hulu. if i made one based purely on my personal taste it would've been something like b99/glow/smash but got definitely deserved at least a much higher place than number 10

This is tea. You could debate the quality toward the end (which is really the only time it fell off), but Game of Thrones will likely be the last of its kind and its scope alone carried it throughout its run. I've never seen shit like that on TV before.

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This companion piece is cute.

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This Decade of Television Owes a Lot to These Late-2000s Shows

Breaking Bad, Parks and Recreation, and More Shows From the Late 2000s That Changed Television

If you look at TV Guide's list of the best shows of the last decade, you'll notice it includes only shows that premiered on or after January 1, 2010. So while it's jam-packed with 25 incredible programs that will be remembered for the ways in which they broke our hearts and busted our guts — sometimes at the same time — the list doesn't necessarily reflect the true scope of the last decade. Specifically, it leaves out series that premiered during the final years of the 2000s that carried over into the next decade, changing the landscape of television forever.

There's an argument to be had about our decision to limit our list to certain parameters — thus excluding a high number of influential programs that aired, but didn't premiere in the past 10 years — but we'd be remiss not to pay tribute to these shows that made so much of what we're seeing on TV now possible.

One of the biggest and most significant shows of this time was Matthew Weiner's 1960s period drama Mad Men, which first introduced the world to womanizing advertising executive Don Draper (Jon Hamm) in 2007. Together with Vince Gilligan's 2008 high-pressure crime drama Breaking Bad, which depicted a high school chemistry teacher's transformation into a drug lord across five adrenaline-fueled seasons, the series put AMC, a network previously best known for airing classic movies, on the map in terms of original scripted programming. Along the way, it also effectively completed the shift in power and creative achievement from broadcast to cable that HBO had begun years earlier with programs like The Sopranos.

Both shows, now regarded as two of the greatest of all time, painted intricate portraits of flawed, morally corrupt men, tracing their rise and fall through deeply complex narratives, powerful performances, and a dedication to style as much as substance. As a result, both Mad Men and Breaking Bad, as well as the detail-oriented creative forces behind them, proved that TV could be an artistic achievement.

Of course, Don Draper and Walter White (Bryan Cranston) weren't the first of their kind; they picked up where men like Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) and Vic Mackey (Michael Chiklis) left off before shepherding in a period in the first half of the 2010s that some have referred to as the Age of the Antihero because of how dominant these types of characters were. Their presence and popularity further opened the door for men like Boardwalk Empire's Nucky Thompson (Steve Buscemi), Sons of Anarchy's Jax Teller (Charlie Hunnam), and House of Cards' Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey), among others.

But as one might expect, they also had the opposite effect as well; in the years since these shows signed off the air — Breaking Bad in 2013 and Mad Men in 2015 — there has been an increase in programming centered on decent, honest people doing good things (Jane the Virgin, Schitt's Creek, even The Good Place). The shift can be interpreted as an exhausted response to the antihero era, a desire for something good and light after many years spent cloaked in metaphorical darkness. Still, the stories of Don Draper and Walter White, lauded by critics for how intricate and nuanced they were, dominated the cultural discussion while they were on... even if the shows weren't necessarily reaching the viewing masses on a weekly basis at first.

Despite their popularity among critics and Emmy voters, Mad Men's average viewership never cracked 3 million, while Breaking Bad's first four seasons averaged less than 2 million apiece. These ratings are particularly noteworthy, at least for Breaking Bad; though the show's first three seasons arrived on Netflix prior to the start of Season 4 in 2011, the series only saw a small increase in viewership that year. It wasn't until the show's final act that it truly benefited from a very real, very obvious Netflix bump: The second half of the final season debuted to nearly 6 million viewers on AMC, while a whopping 10.3 million tuned in to learn Walt and Jesse's (Aaron Paul) fate.

This was the first time a TV series was propped up on a traditional platform simply by being accessible on a readily available streaming service. In the years since, the Netflix bump has benefited series like Lifetime's psychological thriller You, The CW's soapy teen drama Riverdale, and the Canadian comedy Schitt's Creek. Knowing the power that streaming services like Netflix can have in boosting a show's performance and reach, network executives now look closely at streaming numbers as well as linear ratings to help them decide whether to renew or cancel a program, something that obviously couldn't have happened in the past.

By the time Breaking Bad and Mad Men ended, they had cemented their places in the pantheon of TV greats, changing not only the way we tell stories, but also how we consume television and how we talk about and dissect it. But if AMC had the dark, critically acclaimed dramas locked down at the end of the last decade, NBC had its sights set on the bright lights of comedy, debuting two new series in 2009 that would eventually come to exceed viewer expectations by large margins while leaving a lasting mark on viewers' hearts.

When it premiered in April 2009, Greg Daniels and Michael Schur's Parks and Recreation, about small-town government workers in Indiana, failed to connect with audiences after attempting to model itself too closely after The Office, a long-running workplace comedy also developed by Daniels. Luckily, the show quickly and smartly reinvented itself in Season 2 and, as a result, became a heartwarming billboard advertising hard work and competence as a conduit to a happier, kinder existence. Much of the show's optimism and idealism were channeled through Amy Poehler's leading lady, Leslie Knope, and across seven seasons, the people of Pawnee, Indiana, no matter how quirky or strange they may have been, acted as a cool, refreshing reprieve from the darkness depicted in other critically acclaimed programs of the time.

But if Pawnee was populated by good-natured weirdos, Dan Harmon's Community, which also debuted in 2009, took some familiar archetypes and turned them into fleshed-out human beings. The series followed a group of community college students who, led by Joel McHale's cocky and cynical Jeff Winger, almost reluctantly became friends through their study group. By way of their many wild adventures together, the broken individuals of the group, including former jock Troy (Donald Glover, right before he blew up), overachiever Annie (Alison Brie), pop culture-obsessed Abed (Danny Pudi), religious single mother Shirley (Yvette Nicole Brown), pretentious activist Britta (Gillian Jacobs), and boorish former tycoon Pierce (Chevy Chase), became whole. The show's college setting allowed for it to feature a number of unforgettable side characters, too, like Dean Pelton, Star-Burns, Magnitude ("Pop Pop!"), and even Leonard, but it was the show's talented core group, high-concept episodes that regularly parodied pop culture tropes, and its increasingly meta existence that made it one of the most memorable and innovative shows in television history, let alone the last decade.

Looking back, what's most impressive about Parks and Recreation and Community, though, is their longevity — especially in Community's case. NBC fired the mercurial Harmon after Season 3, but the writer returned for the comedy's final two seasons after a lukewarm reception to Season 4. Meanwhile, Chase departed the series in the fourth season after a mutual decision was reached between the actor and the network, Glover opted not to return full-time starting with Season 5, and Brown eventually left to take care of her ailing father, appearing in only a couple of episodes in Season 6. Despite the turnover and the show's perpetually low ratings, it managed to run for six seasons (five on NBC and one on ill-fated streaming experiment Yahoo! Screen).

While shows running for six or seven seasons of 20-plus episodes might have seemed commonplace a decade ago — hell, even five years ago — television as a whole is moving toward shorter seasons and potentially shorter runs. That Parks and Recreation and Community overcame obstacles to beat the odds, often (but not always) producing 22-episode seasons, is a major accomplishment worthy of celebration. Maintaining a certain level of creativity and quality over any length of time is even more impressive, though, especially when compared to basic cable or pay cable series, which can range anywhere from eight to 13 episodes. It's so impressive, in fact, that The Good Wife, another influential series that bowed at the end of the last decade, used the same argument in its memorable 2014 Emmy campaign.

Debuting on CBS in 2009, The Good Wife was a worthy competitor for the prestige cable (and later streaming) series that aired over the last decade, and it was so, in large part, because of its serialized nature. Starring Julianna Margulies as Alicia Florrick, a woman who returns to her career as a lawyer after her husband is jailed following a notorious political and sex scandal, the show ran for seven seasons, maintaining its high quality throughout. In its fifth season, a time when most series are running out of steam and phoning it in, The Good Wife shocked fans when it killed off a major character played by Josh Charles, proving that it was not only capable of going the distance, but that it was going to also produce some of the best and most compelling stories of its run at the same time — and do it all in 22-episode seasons.

The show, which ended in 2016 and later launched a successful CBS All Access spin-off, The Good Fight, was one of the last few broadcast dramas to be able to pull off this sort of feat. The fact that it did so while airing on CBS, a network known for its long-running procedurals and multi-camera comedies, makes it all the more significant. But television has changed since then, and it is still changing today. The only broadcast drama to have been nominated for an Outstanding Drama Emmy since The Good Wife is NBC's emotional family drama This Is Us-- though neither show has walked away with the top prize.

The end of the last decade was an embarrassment of riches for television, and it becomes more and more apparent as we move further and further from that point in time. You simply cannot deny the power of the programs that debuted at the end of the last decade and how they came to dominate a period that would come to see more shows than ever before. And just to drive this point home, we didn't even touch on shows like FX's The League, a raunchy hangout comedy that took the improvisational template of Curb Your Enthusiasm and pushed it in even crazier directions, or The CW's The Vampire Diaries, a teen-centered drama that came in at the end of the vampire craze and helped to change not only the face of a young-skewing network but also the perception of genre fare. Other shows that stand out include Sons of Anarchy (2008-2014), Southland (2009-2013), Glee (2009-2015), Archer (2009-present), and Cougar Town (2009-2015), just to name a few.

So much has changed since these shows premiered, but so much of what we learned from these shows remains, and will remain, as we enter the next decade of television storytelling.

 

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2 minutes ago, Shoaib. said:

This companion piece is cute.

 

glee getting a tiny mention at the end like it didn't redefine queers on tv. we need to take this site down but this piece was cute

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6 minutes ago, Mariah. said:

This is tea. You could debate the quality toward the end (which is really the only time it fell off), but Game of Thrones will likely be the last of its kind and its scope alone carried it throughout its run. I've never seen shit like that on TV before.

i don't know how they gathered everyone to actually want to tune across the world at 12/1/2/3 just to watch a scripted drama .

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Glow snatching a spot :clap: 

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2 minutes ago, shumiley said:

glee getting a tiny mention at the end like it didn't redefine queers on tv. we need to take this site down but this piece was cute

fjfjd I skimmed to find the Parks and Rec mention (Community was cute too) so I only read a third of it tbh!

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also @ any fleabag fans, watch chewing gum. it's a bit more comedic/raunchy but it's a similar concept just of a different tone. it lasted two seasons and it's incredible

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I’ve only seen a few of these in passing, tbh there are some that came to mind that are absent  

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2 minutes ago, Jeigz said:

I’ve only seen a few of these in passing, tbh there are some that came to mind that are absent  

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would you like to share with the class

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32 minutes ago, Shoaib. said:

This companion piece is cute.

 

and long, damn TV Guide!

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5 minutes ago, Mariah. said:

and long, damn TV Guide!

OOPS at the Vampire Diaries mention :shook:. I honestly think at its best it was actually one of the best soaps ever. And alongside Twilight, I think it brought a lot of women into the "genre" space where they didn't feel comfortable occupying before even in spite of shows like Charmed and Buffy in the decade prior.

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I’m SO tired of Fargo being snubbed and for what?

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Wow Handmaid's Tale being snubbed. Surprised OITNB didn't make the list, despite the weak last couple seasons.

Glad GLOW made it, though!

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AHS' bad seasons dragging Asylum down with them.

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I feel accomplished actually having seen a good portion of a list for once.

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Is Bob's Burgers really that girl though? I seen a few episodes by accident when it first came out, and the only one I remember is when Bob shitted himself when he got his ass whooped. I see it talked about often and I never see why it's so huge. Is there some underlying message in the show that I (a non-watcher) just didn't catch when constantly reading about it?

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2 minutes ago, Angelic said:

Is Bob's Burgers really that girl though? I seen a few episodes by accident when it first came out, and the only one I remember is when Bob shitted himself when he got his ass whooped. I see it talked about often and I never see why it's so huge. Is there some underlying message in the show that I (a non-watcher) just didn't catch when constantly reading about it?

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As someone who likes the show, the first few episodes aren't really the best (like most shows in season 1 tbh). I think it's a good show with genuinely funny moments but I don't think it's this amazingly awesome thing revolutionising television. it's just a good, solid show. It seems to fill a void left by the other adult animated shows that have either fallen out of favour (Simpsons, Family guy), ended (Futurama) or just generally aren't super family friendly (South Park though that could be in slot 1, and most of the netflix shows like Bojack) where you can watch it as an adult and like it but you can also watch it with your kids and have it be mostly fine. I can fully see why someone wouldn't be into it though, like it is ugly as sin.

It also just might be relatable to American audiences since it's about a lower income family struggling to keep the family business open in a shitty economy while raising their children and trying to keep it together like ... yeah I can see why some people might relate
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2 minutes ago, Rainbow Heart said:

As someone who likes the show, the first few episodes aren't really the best (like most shows in season 1 tbh). I think it's a good show with genuinely funny moments but I don't think it's this amazingly awesome thing revolutionising television. it's just a good, solid show. It seems to fill a void left by the other adult animated shows that have either fallen out of favour (Simpsons, Family guy), ended (Futurama) or just generally aren't super family friendly (South Park though that could be in slot 1, and most of the netflix shows like Bojack) where you can watch it as an adult and like it but you can also watch it with your kids and have it be mostly fine. I can fully see why someone wouldn't be into it though, like it is ugly as sin.

It also just might be relatable to American audiences since it's about a lower income family struggling to keep the family business open in a shitty economy while raising their children and trying to keep it together like ... yeah I can see why some people might relate
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I'll give it another peek on Hulu.

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You're The Worst is too low and JLD stole Aya Cash's Emmy for S2.

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